Spine Cervical

Widening the Spinal Canal to Manage Cervical Myelopathy

In this article about cervical myelopathy, a new surgical method is described and results using it without spinal fusion are reported for a select group of adults. Cervical myelopathy is a degenerative condition that occurs with aging. Adults affected most often are 50 years old and older. The term myelopathy refers to any problem that affects the spinal cord. Cervical tells us the area affected is the cervical spine (neck region).




I like to knit, crochet, and do other handwork at night after work. I've done this as a form of relaxation for years. But now with a disc problem and bad arthritis, my doctor has recommended fusing two or three of the bones together in my neck. Will I have to give up my sewing?

That's a good question and one you should definitely ask your surgeon. The answer may depend on the type of surgery performed and method of fusion used. With a successful fusion, your neck motion will be limited. Long periods of time with your head and neck bent forward may not be advised -- especially at first during the healing phase.




This is my first year as a parent volunteer with a private high school football team. I played football in high school and college but I'm not a trained coach or athletic trainer. A couple of our kids got a stinger in the game last week. The symptoms seem to be lingering. How do we know when it's safe to let them play again?

Stingers refer to the burning, electrical, or shooting sensation a player feels after forceful contact to the head and/or shoulder by another player. The symptoms are brought on by trauma to the nerves in the neck and don't usually last long.




Our high school son has had two stingers playing football this past season. The coach assures us that everyone playing football gets these from time to time. Should we be worried?

Athletes participating in collision or contact sports are at risk for stingers. Usually it's a temporary injury but it can put a player out permanently. Stingers refer to the burning, electrical, or shooting sensation a player feels after forceful contact to the head and/or shoulder by another player.




Stingers On and Off the Field: What To Do and When To Do It

Athletes participating in collision or contact sports are at risk for stingers. Usually it's a temporary injury but it can put a player out permanently. In this article, doctors from the University of Washington (Seattle) review the controversies around this injury. Decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and return-to-play are discussed. The need for equipment modifications to prevent stingers has been questioned and debated. The pros and cons of such a move are also presented.




I've been getting massages for six months now for chronic neck pain after a car accident. They seem to help, but since I don't have another me to clone (one who doesn't go for massage therapy), I have no idea how I would feel without the massages. Sometimes I wonder if I'm just fooling myself. Is there any evidence that massage really makes a difference?

Massage therapists are starting to do some research these days to study the effects of this very pleasant and soothing modality. Does it really work? How long do the effects last? Does it work better than something else like acupuncture or laser therapy? These are the kinds of questions they are trying to answer.




Massage: Popular Treatment for Neck Pain. Is It Effective?

Everyone loves a good massage -- especially if you have neck pain. But does it really help? Are the effects long lasting or effective enough to make it cost-effective? That's what these researchers from the University of Washington in Seattle set out to study. Given the fact that many adults suffer neck pain every year, these are important questions.




Two Key Predictors of Work Disability After Whiplash Injury

Researchers say the cost of whiplash injuries is far more than ever imagined. It turns out that long-term sick leave and disability pensions for chronic pain from whiplash associated disorder (WAD) cost much more than acute medical care. This could mean that routine medical care right after a rear-end collision could save a lot of money in medical costs later.




I can't believe how many employees I've lost over the last year due to whiplash injuries from nonwork-related car accidents. Just looking at how many are now receiving disability pensions, I'd say it's a lot cheaper to take time off from work up front and get help before this becomes a serious problem. Am I right? Or maybe it doesn't matter -- if it's gonna happen, there's nothing stopping it. What do you think?

Researchers say the cost of whiplash injuries is far more than ever imagined. Just as you suspected, it turns out that long-term sick leave and disability pensions for chronic pain from whiplash associated disorder (WAD) cost much more than acute medical care. This could mean that routine medical care right after a rear-end collision could save a lot of money in medical costs later.




I am disabled and my wife is the main bread winner. I'm worried because she had a car accident about three months ago and she still doesn't seem back to normal. We can't afford for her to lose her job. I'm hoping the fact that her job doesn't require a lot of thought will hide the fact that she just isn't thinking right. Will she recover with a little more time?

Your wife may be suffering from a condition referred to as whiplash associated disorder or postwhiplash syndrome. This is a common problem after a rear-end collision in which the neck is strained from a fast forward-backward head movement. Muscle soreness is common for a few days after such an injury. But neck pain can persist for months to even years later.




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