Spine Cervical

I my first car accident -- I was hit from the side by a driver who ran a stop sign. My car and my neck were totalled. It's been six weeks and my neck is painful and stiff, I have headaches and ringing in the ears, and I can't sleep laying down. How much longer will this go on? I'm usually up and on my feet after a few days, but this has knocked me flat.

When the head and neck are suddenly and forcefully whipped forward and back (or side to side), mechanical forces place great strain on the cervical spine (neck). Traumatic disc rupture and soft tissue damage can occur after such a whiplash injury. The cartilage between the disc and the vertebral bone can get cracked. This is known as a rim lesion.




I rear-ended someone last month who is making a mountain out of a molehill. She is claiming she has a severe whiplash injury from the accident. I was only going five miles per hour when it happened. The insurance companies will duke it out. But I'm sure I'll be paying higher premiums for it. Is there any way to prove this lady doesn't really have such a severe problem as she says?

Whiplash is defined as a sudden extension of the cervical spine (backward movement of the neck) and flexion (forward movement of the neck). This type of trauma is also referred to as a cervical acceleration-deceleration (CAD) injury. Rear-end or side-impact motor vehicle collisions are the number one cause of whiplash with injury to the muscles, ligaments, tendons, joints, and discs of the cervical spine.




I was in a car accident (my fault) while out shopping with a friend. My friend tends to be a bit on the hysterical side normally. I felt terrible about the accident, but she hasn't quit complaining about the pain in her neck from the whiplash. I had a little stiffness and soreness for a day or two but that was all. Are these problems really just personality driven?

Beliefs about whiplash and anxiety-related distress can lead to pain catastrophizing. This refers to a negative focus on pain, whether that pain is real or anticipated. A person's pain is increased or amplified and prolonged because of the way they view every physical action as a possible source of pain. This type of thinking becomes a habit and leads to chronic pain and disability.




I work as an EMT on an ambulance service. My sister is a nurse in an emergency department. We both see patients involved in motor vehicle accidents who end up with a chronic neck problem from whiplash. She thinks it's because the patients are told to expect that when they are discharged from the hospital. I think it's the ones who are hysterical and over anxious from the start. Does anyone really know?

Many studies have been done to identify what it is about some people who have a whiplash injury from a car accident that causes them to develop chronic neck pain. Is it the severity of the injury or the way they view the experience? A recent study from the Netherlands may help answer the question. The researchers looked at the role of catastrophizing and causal beliefs as possible predictive factors in postwhiplash syndrome.




I've had pain in my low neck area for three months now. I'm thinking I need to so something, but what? Is there an exercise program I should be doing? What do you advise?

Neck pain is a common reason people visit their doctor. Neck pain typically doesn't start from a single injury. Instead, the problem usually develops over time from the stress and strain of daily activities. Eventually, the parts of the spine begin to degenerate. The degeneration can become a source of neck pain.




I run a small chain of local hotels in the west. On any given day, there are always two or three desk clerks complaining of neck pain. Is there something about the job that's causing this? Or is it just that young people don't want to work so they call in sick with various aches and pains? I'm losing money over this issue.

Without a closer look at your front desk and staff, we can only offer some general suggestions. First, be aware that neck pain is a very common problem in the adult population. In fact, studies show that on any given day, 20 per cent of adults in the United States report similar symptoms. And two-thirds of all adults will experience neck pain at some point their lives.




What Causes Chronic Pain From a Whiplash Injury?

Despite many studies on whiplash patients, we still don't know why some people get better quickly while others suffer head and neck pain for months to years after the injury or accident. In this study from the Danish Pain Research Center, previous studies are continued looking for more clues to the problem.




Impairment-Based Physical Therapy Program for Neck Pain

Neck pain got you down? You're not alone. On any given day, 20 per cent of adults in the United States report similar symptoms. And two-thirds of all adults will experience neck pain at some point their lives. Some get better without treatment. Others seek the services of physical therapists.




The Effect of Hidden Beliefs on PostWhiplash Syndrome

What is it about some people who have a whiplash injury from a car accident that causes them to develop chronic neck pain referred to as postwhiplash syndrome? Is it the severity of the injury or the way they view the experience? In this study, researchers from the Netherlands look at the role of catastrophizing and causal beliefs as possible predictive factors in postwhiplash syndrome.




I had a cervical spine fusion at C45 six months ago. This morning I was in a hurry to get to work and ran smack dab into the garage door (it wasn't open all the way). I don't have a headache, but I'm scared to death that I undid the surgery. What should I do now?

You can always call your surgeon and ask for an exam. Imaging such as an X-ray or MRI may be ordered. But the surgeon may also be able to tell what's going on by comparing the results of your last tests with your current clinical presentation.

He or she will carefully assess your motion, muscles, and joints. Specific clinical signs of fusion disruption are not real obvious right away. Pain (neck and head) pain are the usualy first signal to watch out for.




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