Spine Lumbar

I'm going to have back surgery to remove two discs. I've heard different advice about restricting my activities after the operation. What's the latest on this?

There are many debates going on about this. Much of the difficulty comes because of patient's fears that he or she will reinjure the back. Many doctors suggest active treatment or rehab after lumbar disc surgery. Others adopt a more "minimal" approach, such as telling the patient to do what feels comfortable.




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I've tried a bunch of different core training programs to strengthen my trunk and prevent a recurrence of back pain. I don't really know which exercises to do -- there are so many. Can you recommend maybe a core group of core exercises I can do every day without worrying about which ones to do on which day?

Experts agree based on repeated studies that strengthening and stabilization exercises work! They strengthen the trunk (abdomen and spine) and go a long way toward preventing back pain and relapses from previous back pain episodes.




Does it matter if the physical therapist manipulates my back with me on my side versus on my back? When my regular therapist was gone, I noticed the therapist who took the regular therapist's place used the same kind of technique but from a different angle. Should I say something? I am being treated for low back pain at the moment.

For some time now, physical therapists have been trying to find better ways to treat patients with low back pain. By better we mean more effective treatment with successful results. And successful refers to getting relief from pain that doesn't come back.




Low Back Pain Patients Respond to Thrust Manipulation Techniques

For some time now, physical therapists have been trying to find better ways to treat patients with low back pain. By better we mean more effective treatment with successful results. And successful refers to getting relief from pain that doesn't come back.




I'm going to have a lumbar fusion for severe arthritic degeneration in my lower spine. I have three ways to go: I can get bone from a bone bank. The surgeon can take some bone from my pelvic bone and transfer it to the fusion site. Or they can bypass the real bone and use a new product that is a bone graft substitute. The hospital business office tells me the new technique is less expensive. Why would it be a cost savings to use a product I have to purchase if I could use my own bone instead?

A recently published review of all studies done on bone graft substitutes might help answer your question. The authors of the review looked at the literature already published looking on bone substitutes for lumbar fusion. They limited their search to articles in English. They included studies that used either an anterior (from the front of the spine) surgical approach or posterior (from the back of the spine) surgical approach.




Review of Various Types of Bone Graft Substitute for Lumbar Fusion

It's time. Time to take a closer look at materials used as a substitute for bone graft in lumbar fusions. How well do they work? Do they all give equally good results? How do they stack up against the patient's own bone donated for the procedure? This systematic review examines each one of these questions searching for some answers.




Oh boy -- I woke up this morning with intense back pain. It seems to be better as I move around. I can only sit long enough to type this out and get some advice. How long will I be laid up? What can I do to speed up getting better?

Most experts agree that unless you have had an injury or traumatic event that could have caused a spinal fracture, it's best to keep moving and stay active. Since you say you woke up with this pain, think back to yesterday or the day before to identify any possible causes. If you were involved in some type of trauma, you may need to see your doctor for an examination.




Examining Neck and Back Pain: Can We Predict the Response to Treatment?

If you've ever had neck or back pain, you know that your immediate concern is often how long is this going to last? Or maybe even will I ever get better? Researchers are busy trying to figure out the many pieces to the puzzle presented by spine pain.




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